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Leaving the city

Leaving the city

Maybe it’s not the end of time -yet- but a vast majority of us have probably considered that possibility recently. A total collapse. Economically, ecologically, politically. People are dying, people are suffering, people are loosing their jobs, and even for the most privileged ones, the future doesn’t look great.

The Millenials struggled a lot more than their parents to achieve less. They went (or still go) to College, they can speak several languages, sometimes they lived in another continent for a few months and went back home with lots of projects in mind. It was so exciting.

Indeed, growing up in the 2010s was great. Facebook was there, Instagram was not that far away, and 9/11 appeared as a distant memory. Netflix and Marvel were going to create “great” shows and movies for as cheap as… well, it was not that cheap actually. But we felt good, with our brand new iPhones, and tablets to read “amazing” Twitter feeds and snapchats and stories showing “awesome”… Well, let’s say it was OK.

Populist leaders gained popularity like never before, threatening democracy as a whole. The world was already bleeding.

But in fact, the reality was a bit different, and we all knew it quite well. Inequality worsened over the decade, terrorists attacks happened all around the world, a financial crisis put millions of people out of work while populist leaders gained popularity like never before, threatening democracy as a whole. The world was already bleeding.

Now the virus. The well-known Covid-19. And all its consequences. When we think about it, we still can’t believe it. Is that really happening in 2020? Are we dreaming or are they 3.9 billion people on lockdown? OK, this is cra-zy. Absolutely crazy.

So what can we do? Help. Of course. By all means. There are a lot of different ways to help others, and each of us can do more in that matter. But what’s next? There’s a high chance we’re not all going to die. So we need to think about that near future -for the weeks, the months and the years to come.

At first glance, we must say it: our lifestyles don’t make much sense. We grow up, we go to College, then we work -if we can find a job- and then we struggle. Of course there are still different social classes, but for the vast majority of us, we are just in the middle. Not that poor, not that rich. With just enough money to go to the restaurant once or twice a month. And maybe Netflix, or Disney+, Spotify, or… whatever the fuck else.

Our dreams are high, but the reality is so different it could take three decades to change our condition.

In fact, it’s all bullshit. Our dreams are high, but the reality is so different it could take three decades to change our condition. Even if we go to Yale -since the student loans won’t disappear like that, even after the pandemic. No joke.

So again, what’s next? Should we stick to our vague dreams and keep fighting for 9 to 5 lives? Or should we think differently? Should we change our goals? Or our lifestyles?

Maybe you say to yourself you like going to venues, bars, restaurants, maybe you say to yourself you love going to Macy’s or just hanging out in… the metro. Maybe you say to yourself life has never been easy for anyone, therefore, we can overcome this crisis. You’re right, don’t give up!

But hey. What are you struggling with? Is that really necessary? Do you really want all those things, things, things? Honestly, you know you don’t.

Maybe it’s time to move on. Start something new, somewhere else, maybe with different persons. The first step could be, for those who think they can’t depart from urban life, to leave the city.

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